Category Archives: Event

Clutter to treasure

Wivey Action on Climate are holding our third Give or Take for Free from 11am to 12 noon on Saturday, 7th October 2017 at Kingsmead School car park.

This time, there will be a focus on children’s toys, games and books, but any surplus items can be given away to others to put them to good use again. The events have proved great for exchanging many household goods, including tools, kitchen ware, ornaments, small furniture, garden pots, CDs, etc. Children’s items have proved particularly popular and, previously, items given away have included bikes, toys and sports equipment. All are welcome either to give or just take or both.

No electrical appliances are accepted as they can’t be tested for safety, but it is hoped this can be addressed at future Give or Takes. No money changes hands and items are given free for personal use only, so no traders.

These events help reduce waste and consumerism by extending the useful life of goods. Bring items in your car to display from the boot or bring on foot and display on the ground.

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2nd Give or Take for Free

Our second Give or Take for Free event on 22 April, 2017 at Kingsmead School car park was another success with plenty of givers and takers.

Unwanted household goods were cleared out and given a further recycled life by others. Items passed on included books, toys, DVDs, suitcases, tools, kitchen ware, small items of furniture, envelopes, pictures, pea sticks, games, paving stones and much else besides.

It was another lovely morning with plenty of pleasant chat. Don’t miss the next one!

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Visit to local wind turbine

Wivey Action on Climate members visited a local wind turbine near Clatworthy on a misty morning on 30th October 2016.

The turbine was installed five years ago, but has had some operating and maintenance problems relating to wind flow from the steep valley below. It was generating during our visit and it was good to see the blades turning.

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Most wind power comes from much larger turbines, but small installations, like roof-top solar, can still make a good contribution to local energy use.

In 2015, official statistics show renewable energy contributed 22-26% of the UK’s electricity (depending on calculation method) with onshore wind being the biggest contributor, followed by biomass (plant energy crops) and then offshore wind and solar.

Feed-in tariffs are still available for wind turbines and there are many turbine suppliers and installers, including:

In the Wiveliscombe area, there are at least four small wind turbines, but many siting constraints due to the landscape, grid capacity and potential interference with regional radar, including at Cobbacombe and Yeovilton.

Wivey call for clean energy

Wivey Action on Climate showed our support for The Climate Coalition’s national week of action by gathering on 15th October 2016 in front of the 123 community-owned solar panels on the Paddocks Nursery and Children’s Centre.

The week of action has been supported throughout the country and calls for 100% clean energy within a generation.

Our event also celebrated the amount of renewable energy generated in Wiveliscombe, which now has 13,479 solar panels, mostly installed over the last five years. They are on 70 local roofs, including both schools, and at a small solar farm hidden away on the edge of town. Over the year, Wivey’s solar power generates the equivalent of nearly 60% of the domestic electricity used in the town.

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We have also contacted Taunton Deane MP, Rebecca Pow, to ask her to support clean energy in parliament to help secure a sustainable future for our children and our planet.

Thanks very much to all members and supporters who were able to join us on the 15th and especially to Rupert Mardon for the photo with our banners.

The Climate Coalition have published an excellent and succinct guide to explain why 100% clean energy is desirable, possible and still within reach in the UK – click here to view or download.

Visit to new hydro power station near Dulverton

Members of Wivey Action on Climate had an enjoyable and interesting visit to a new hydro power scheme on the River Barle near Dulverton on 7th May 2016.

The site has had a weir, associated with turbines for power generation, for at least a century, which at one time supplied electricity for lighting to all of Dulverton. This ended with the arrival of the national grid in 1939, but the power station was maintained for emergency purposes throughout the Second World War.

The plant was dismantled in the 1950s, with fish traps then installed and used until the 1980s.

Planning for the new hydro power station started in 2010. After licences and permissions were obtained, work started on installation in early 2015 and generation started in December 2015. Site works are now nearing completion.

A lot of care has been taken to minimise any impact on the river and fish, with improvements made to the weir and features to allow both eels and salmon to return back upstream. On-going monitoring will continue to check water flow and fish health, with corrective action taken if necessary.

The weir offers a net head or water drop of 3m for power generation, by means of a 3 bladed Archimedean screw turbine, rated at 74kWp.

Average water flow at the weir is 5.3 cubic meters per second and the Environment Agency has granted a licence permitting maximum instantaneous abstraction of 4 cubic meters per second, with a requirement to allow a continuous minimum flow over the weir alongside the power scheme.

The expected annual power generation is 340,000kWh, which is equivalent to the electricity used by about 85 homes.

Guide for the tour was Jane Ruell, who has been centrally involved with the planning and management of the project.

We were delighted to see a Dipper had made a secure nest within the turbine building and used the weir as an ideal feeding ground.

Click on photos to view as a full size slide show.

Pledge for climate action

Wivey Action on Climate has launched a pledge for climate action (click this link to sign).

The more who pledge, the more it shows that local people want action. The number pledging will be recorded on our website and reported to local papers and to our local councillors and MP.

Why pledge

Carbon is released into atmosphere by burning fossil fuels and by other human activities, including farming and waste disposal.

We need to use energy more efficiently and to generate more from renewable sources, so carbon emissions can be reduced by 50% by 2025 (UK target) and fossil fuel use ended by 2100.

If we do not restrict our carbon emissions, they will continue to accumulate in the atmosphere and oceans. Carbon in the atmosphere acts like a blanket trapping more heat on the Earth, so causing global warming and climate change.

Collecting pledges at Carnival Market.
Collecting pledges at Carnival Market.

Growing carbon pollution causes extreme weather, heat waves, flooding, melting glaciers, rising seas, acidified oceans, reduced crop yields and changes the range of wildlife habitats, putting some species at risk. These effects could become very severe unless we limit the growing build-up of carbon.

To avoid the most threatening effects, a target has been set to limit average global warming to no more than 2 degrees Centigrade. But global warming has already reached close to half this target and not enough action is being taken yet to prevent it from being exceeded.

Our pledge adds your voice to the many calling for action and helps you make an effective contribution to stopping climate change.

What difference can be made by our pledges – see: contribution made by climate action pledges

Please sign our climate action pledge by clicking here.